Writing about plants for kindergarten

Our final project for our plant theme is to eat the parts of plants!

It shows the plant life cycle based on an apple, pumpkin, and sunflower. It is color coded green. And there is a matching printable for each set. Our first plant food activity is our Tops And Bottoms salad! Plant Parts You can get so involved when it comes to plant parts, but this anchor chart is a nice simplified version for younger learners. We have also included rubrics to assess student writing. We built up our vocabulary and understanding of plant parts by drawing our Gro-ables and labeling them. We picked up a card that shows either parts of a plant, or something a plant needs to grow and survive. After studying plants, their parts and their needs, the students create a plant poster and label the parts of plants and the needs of plants. Since this topic gave me lots of terms and picture to work with, I created two similar syllable sorts. And then we make a salad of all the plants from the book Tops And Bottoms! Our Plants are Growing! Our Gro-ables have really taken off — just look at how much they have grown!

And then we make a salad of all the plants from the book Tops And Bottoms! Simply cut the bottom off of the celery and dip in paint.

what is a plant for kindergarten

As part of all of our Mad Science Experiments, we make predictions and record our hypothesis and outcomes! Here is a shot at Not a Plant pocket chart pieces. Then we use the printable included in the pack to make sure we know the parts of the plant along with their terms.

Plant Science To help us understand how the parts of a plant work, we do our rainbow flowers experiment! So, my PC and I had some bonding time late into the night and during nap times. And here are the pocket chart sorting pieces.

Plant Books.

I broke down the unit into 4 sections that can be taught independently and in any order. First up, we use art as an assessment tool. Students clap out the pictures and place the item on the mat. This is a celery painting! Here is a look at the other syllable math and cards as well as the printable. Here is a shot at Not a Plant pocket chart pieces. I project the chart then write on it using the mimeo or promethean pen. Stamp the flower onto the paper. Use pasta dyed green and orange to make the filler. They also loved noticing the differences between each type of plant, such as how their leaves looked as they grew. Here are the whole group charts. We have been thrilled to leave the cold behind and welcome spring with some fun planting and gardening activities! We always do this on day 1 so we can watch how our flowers change! And there are so many fun ideas!

The font color and lines used are all green for easy management. We add our schema on the first day of our research project.

teachers pay teachers

Students then use their fingers to make stems! We will learn the parts of plants, plant life cycles, how we use plants, what plants need to grow, and how plants help people! We also play a game with these pieces called back to back.

I loved how clear the instructions were on each pod, and how my kids could be highly involved in the process. We also draw flowers, paint carrots and use plants to paint pictures! They combined the theme of the week to a skill. Plants, Animals, and CO2 This anchor chart takes the life cycle concept one step further, showing how plants and animals depend on one another for survival. I start with a whole group chart discussing what a plant is. One section is dedicated to teaching students what a plant is and what a plant is not. As we learn about platns, we add new learning and address any misconceptions! I use the fillable chart via my projector to lead the discussion. I broke down the unit into 4 sections that can be taught independently and in any order. They were very simple to plant, which I really appreciated since I was planting with a classroom of kids.
Rated 5/10 based on 86 review
Download
Plants Print & Play Pack